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Man’s Penis Amputated After “Enthusiastic” Viagra Overdose


 

Man has his penis amputated after deliberately overdosing on Viagra to impress his girlfriend

  • The 66-year-old from Gigante, Colombia, is said to be a former politician
  • Was reported to have suffered from an erection for ‘several days’
  • Doctors referred him to a medical facility with ‘inflammation and fractures’
  • Medical staff say he is now recovering in hospital

By Wills Robinson

PUBLISHED: 10:36 EST, 22 September 2013 | UPDATED: 11:38 EST, 22 September 2013

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A man from southern Colombia had to have his penis amputated after he allegedly overdosed on Viagra to impress his girlfriend.

The 66-year-old man from Gigante, Colombia, whose name has not been released, told a local newspaper that he intentionally overdosed on the erectile dysfunction medicine.

He then is said to have suffered an erection for several days before being forced to seek medical advice.

Impress: The 66-year old from Gigante, Colombia, said to have overdosed on the penis-enhancing medicine to show off to his new girlfriend (file picture)

 

 

According to news website Colombia Reports, the penis-enhancing drug caused the man, who is said to be a farmer and a former politician, to develop signs of gangrene.

When he sought medical help, doctors in Gigante referred the man to a medical facility in Neiva, where medical staff noted that the man’s penis was inflamed and fractured.

Doctors: Medical staff said the unnamed man was inflamed and had many fractues

 

They informed the patient his only option was amputation so the inflammation and gangrene would stop spreading to other parts of his body.

A doctor told local newspaper La Nacion: ‘The patient showed bruising on the testicles and penis, was treated and is recovering well.’

As a result of the incident, Neiva hospital issued a warning for men to not use penis enhancing drugs or erectile dysfunction medication without prescription from their doctors.

Earlier this week, a Yemeni man died of a Viagra overdose as he prepared to sleep with his bride on their first day as a married couple.

The 25-year-old Yemeni man dosed up on five Viagra pills at one time which killed him, according to Yemini Arabic Language daily newspapwer Okaz Al Youm.

Once the wedding hall was cleared out, the unnamed man left to join his wife at their new home.

When he arrived, he fainted and collapsed and died after being taken to hospital despite doctors’ attempts to revive him.

Viagra contains the ingredient sildenafil citrate, which works by relaxing muscles in the walls of blood vessels. 

However, the action that Viagra has on nerve activity of muscles in the penis may also increase sympathetic nerve activity (which makes blood vessels constrict).

There have been several reports of heart attack, heart arrhythmia and even deaths that have been related to men who were using Viagra.

Men with unstable cardiovascular disease, including a history of heart attacks, are advised against using the drug.

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The Average American Family Pays $6,000 a Year in Subsidies to Big Business


That’s over and above our payments to the big companies for energy and food and housing and health care and all our tech devices. It’s $6,000 that no family would have to pay if we truly lived in a competitive but well-regulated free-market economy.

The $6,000 figure is an average, which means that low-income families are paying less. But it also means that families (households) making over $72,000 are paying more than $6,000 to the corporations.

1. $870 for Direct Subsidies and Grants to Companies

The Cato Institute estimates that the U.S. federal government spends $100 billion a year on corporate welfare. That’s an average of $870 for each one of America’s 115 million families. Cato notes that this includes “cash payments to farmers and research funds to high-tech companies, as well as indirect subsidies, such as funding for overseas promotion of specific U.S. products and industries…It does not include tax preferences or trade restrictions.”

It does include payments to 374 individuals on the plush Upper East Side of New York City, and others who own farms, including Bruce Springsteen, Bon Jovi, and Ted Turner. Wealthy heir Mark Rockefeller received $342,000 to NOT farm, to allow his Idaho land to return to its natural state.

It also includes fossil fuel subsidies, which could be anywhere from $10 billion to $41 billion per year for research and development. Yet this may be substantially underestimated. The IMF reports U.S. fossil fuel subsidies of $502 billion, which would be almost $4,400 per U.S. family by taking into account “the effects of energy consumption on global warming [and] on public health through the adverse effects on local pollution.” According to Gristeven this is an underestimate.

2. $696 for Business Incentives at the State, County, and City Levels

The subsidies mentioned above are federal subsidies. A New York Times investigation found that states, counties and cities give up over $80 billion each year to companies, with beneficiaries coming from “virtually every corner of the corporate world, encompassing oil and coal conglomerates, technology and entertainment companies, banks and big-box retail chains.”

 

$80 billion a year is $696 for every U.S. family. But the Times notes that “The cost of the awards is certainly far higher.”

3. $722 for Interest Rate Subsidies for Banks

According to the Huffington Post, the “U.S. Government Essentially Gives The Banks 3 Cents Of Every Tax Dollar.” They cite research that calculates a nearly 1 percent benefit to banks when they borrow, through bonds and customer deposits and other liabilities. This amounts to a taxpayer subsidy of $83 billion, or about $722 from every American family.

The wealthiest five banks — JPMorgan, Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc., Wells Fargo & Co. and Goldman Sachs — account for three-quarters of the total subsidy. The Huffington Post article notes that without the taxpayer subsidy, those banks would not make a profit. In other words, “the profits they report are essentially transfers from taxpayers to their shareholders.”

4. $350 for Retirement Fund Bank Fees

This was a tough one to calculate. Demos reports that over a lifetime, bank fees can “cost a median-income two-earner family nearly $155,000 and consume nearly one-third of their investment returns.” Fees are well over one percent a year.

However, the Economic Policy Institute notes that the average middle-quintile retirement account is $34,981. A conservative one percent annual management fee translates to about $350 per family. This, again, is an average; many families have no retirement account. But many families pay much more than 1% in annual fees.

5. $1,268 for Overpriced Medications

According to Dean Baker, “government granted patent monopolies raise the price of prescription drugs by close to $270 billion a year compared to the free market price.” This represents an astonishing annual cost of over $2,000 to an average American family.

OECD figures on pharmaceutical expenditures reveal that Americans spend almost twice the OECD average on drugs, an additional $460 per capita. This translates to $1,268 per household.

6. $870 for Corporate Tax Subsidies

We’ve heard a lot about tax avoidance and tax breaks for the super-rich. With regard to corporations alone, the Tax Foundation has concluded that their “special tax provisions” cost taxpayers over $100 billion per year, or $870 per family. Corporate benefits include items such as Graduated Corporate Income, Inventory Property Sales, Research and Experimentation Tax Credit, Accelerated Depreciation, and Deferred taxes.

Once again, it may be even worse. Citizens for Tax Justice cite a Government Accountability Office report that calculated a loss to the Treasury of $181 billion from corporate tax expenditures. That would be almost $1,600 per family.

7. $1,231 for Revenue Losses from Corporate Tax Havens

U.S. PIRG recently reported that the average 2012 taxpayer paid an extra $1,026 in taxes to make up for the revenue lost from offshore tax havens by corporations and wealthy individuals. With 138 million taxpayers (1.2 per household), that comes to $1,231 per household.

Much More Than an Insult

Overall, American families are paying an annual $6,000 subsidy to corporations that have doubled their profits and cut their taxes in half in ten years while cutting 2.9 million jobs in the U.S. and adding almost as many jobs overseas.

This is more than an insult. It’s a devastating attack on the livelihoods of tens of millions of American families. And Congress just lets it happen.

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An Anniversary Prank Gone Wrong



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